Lost to Time and Tide

There were no constructed harbours in this part of Dublin Bay before the early 1800’s. Boats, small ones that is, landed on shale and sandy ground in front of where the wonderful little harbour of Sandycove is now situated. Similarly at Bullock, there was no constructed harbour but there had always been a natural rock […]

Dublin Shipyards

Irish Shipbuilding Miscellaneous Dublin yards While the main shipbuilding in Dublin Involved the Liffey yard,  later Vickers, and Ross & Walpole several early years have disappeared without trace. Viking shipbuilding During construction work a Viking shipbuilding area was discovered on Dublin quays near the civic offices at Wood Quay.  The site is marked by a […]

G2, the Coastwatching Service and the Battle of the Atlantic: 1939-41

G2, the Coastwatching Service and the Battle of the Atlantic: 1939-41 Michael Kennedy (difp at iol.ie) [This paper is an early version of the introduction to the Guarding Neutral Ireland: the coastwatching service and military intelligence 1939-45 (Four Courts Press, 2008)] A PDF version of this article is available: click here On the evening of […]

The Boyd Disaster

Boyd statue by farrell 10

THE BOYD DISASTER. by Cormac F. Lowth cormaclowth@utvinternet.com   And such the trust that still were mine, Though stormy winds swept o’er the brine, Or through the tempest’s fiery breath, Raise me from sleep to wreck and death. Emma Hart Willard, Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep. February 1861 will be remembered not only […]

DunLaoghaire Harbour

KingstownHarbourC1890

In November 1807 two ships, the Rochdale and Prince of Wales set sail from Pigeonhouse harbour in Dublin, bound for England. They were carrying newly recruited militia for the Napoleonic War, and their families. But bad fortune struck and an easterly gale forced the two ships onto rocks between Blackrock and Seapoint. They were wrecked […]

The Dublin Port Diving Bell

Bell 23 RESTORED BELL

The Dublin Port Diving Bell by Cormac F. Lowth This article was first published in The International Journal of Diving History, Volume 3, Number 1, July 2010   In  the  nineteenth  century,  several  factors  combined,  which  both  facilitated  and  necessitated  the expansion of the Port of Dublin. The seaward approaches to Dublin Port have always […]

Baily Optic

optic

This working Optic is the light from Baily lighthouse in Howth, North Dublin. It was installed in 1902 and removed in 1972 when the lighthouse was modernised. The lighthouse was originally gas, then vapourised paraffin powered, the light was equivalent to 2,000,000 candle power. The optic now shines a lesser light over the museum. Bailey […]

LOP 6 Howth Head

guarding neutral ireland

LOP 6 Howth Head The Coastwatching Service in Howth, Co. Dublin: LOP 6, the Summit, Howth Michael Kennedy (difp at iol.ie)   [paper delivered to the Howth Historical Society, February 2009]  I: Introduction May I begin by thanking you for the invitation to address the society this evening, as it is always a pleasure to […]

RMS Leinster, over 500 died

Leinster Postcard

An exhibit illustrating this event will, on occasion, be displayed in the Museum The date is 10th October 1918. The place is Kingstown (now DunLaoghaire), Britain (of which Ireland is an integral part) is at war with Germany. A war that came to a close within a number of weeks. At the Carlisle pier one […]

History of the MII

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History of the Maritime Institute of Ireland INSTITUTE FOUNDED AT CRITICAL TIME IN IRELAND’S HISTORY The Maritime Institute of Ireland was founded in 1941 at one of the most critical moments in this country’s history. Some of the founders and earliest supporters had been trying to impress on the general public and on government for […]