Posts tagged with ‘Dublin’

  • Irish Shipbuilding -Miscellaneous Dublin yards - While the main shipbuilding in Dublin Involved the Liffey yard, later Vickers, and Ross & Walpole several early years have disappeared without trace. - This short article remembers some Dublin shipyars

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  • This paper is an early version of the introduction to the Guarding Neutral Ireland: the coastwatching service and military intelligence 1939-45 (Four Courts Press, 2008)

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  •   THE BOYD DISASTER. by Cormac F. Lowth cormaclowth@utvinternet.com   January and February have always been the worst months for storms around the east coast of Ireland and the year 1861 was no exception as the customary storms of February proved to be exceptionally severe.  One of the worst storms on record began on Friday 8th and continued to blow

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  • In November 1807 two ships, the Rochdale and Prince of Wales set sail from Pigeonhouse harbour in Dublin, bound for England. They were carrying newly recruited militia for the Napoleonic War, and their families. But bad fortune struck and an easterly gale forced the two ships onto rocks between Blackrock and Seapoint. They were wrecked and nearly 400 people drowned.

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  • The story of this diving bell which still rests in the port. For its time it was technially advanced. The article covers why it was required, how it was invented and construced, and its success. It is the story of the great engineer Bindon Blood Stoney as well as the story of the men who worked in the Bell.

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  • The tragic events of Christmas 1895. The Kingstown Lifeboat Disaster. The lifeboat and its crew of 15 were lost.

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  • This working Optic is the light from Baily lighthouse in Howth, North Dublin. It was installed in 1902 and removed in 1972 when the lighthouse was modernised. The lighthouse was originally gas, then vaporised paraffin powered, the light was equivalent to 2,000,000 candle power. The optic now shines a lesser light over the museum.

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  • LOP 6 Howth Head

    Michael Kennedy, author of Guarding Neutral Ireland, discusses the role of the Look Out Posts, in this case, the LOP on Howth Head, in recording events in the Irish Sea during World War II, known as "The Emergency".

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  • RMS Leinster, over 500 died

    An exhibit illustrating this event will, on occasion, be displayed in the Museum The date is 10th October 1918. The place is Kingstown (now DunLaoghaire), Britain (of which Ireland is an integral part) is at war with Germany. A war that came to a close within a number of weeks. At the Carlisle pier one of the Kingstown to Holyhead

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